Task 2: Type of injury & Prevalance


Hamstring strains and tears can be a result of both direct and indirect forces. Most commonly a hamstring strain is classified by a resulting indirect force, with a regular example when landing after a jump resulting in an overstretching of the hamstring muscles. This is an external force causing injury to a body part away from the point of impact, in this case being the feet.

Being a common injury amongst many types of high intensity sports, the sport of AFL will be used as an example, referring to the 2009 Annual AFL Injury Report for statistics and evidence.

The annual AFL injury report of 2009 states:
"The number one injury in the game remains the hamstring strain. Both incidence and prevalence rates of this injury remain high. Incidence of hamstring injuries increased in 2009"

This is shown by the evidence in table 1.1.

Year
'00
'01
'02
'03
'04
'05
'06
'07
'08
'09
10 year average
Av.
Hamstring Strains

5.6
6.0
4.4
5.7
6.3
5.2
6.4
6.7
6.6
7.1
6.0
Table 1.1 (Orchard, 2010)

The table indicates that the number of average hamstring strains in each club are on the rise, which reflects the great threat that this type of injury presents in this particular sport in current times.

A study involving 1,614 individuals who had hamstring injuries, revealed that hamstring injuries composed 54% of rugby injuries, 10% of soccer, 14% of track & field and less than 2% in tennis, squash, ballet and gymnastics (Oakes, 2010).